Cajun Culture, History Galore and Ghosts!

OK, yeah, The Myrtles really has some crazy stuff  going on there. But for my time and money, I'll skip the big crowd of lookey-loos at this gorgeous antebellum property and head 15 minutes down the road to the Civil War Battlefield of Port Hudson! It was at the Battlefield that the ghosts came through so strongly that 2 minutes into the movie documenting the battle, I was forced to pull out my equipment.

Fort Desperation at Port Hudson Civil War Battlefield.

Fort Desperation at Port Hudson Civil War Battlefield.

It was here that I had immediate interaction with ghosts that wanted to talk and to interact with the living! It was here that I found friendly park rangers who were excited and willing to share their personal experiences, the history and, who gave me tips on how to best spend my time. It was here, midday, that I found myself able to investigate on an isolated and quiet battlefield, in solitude and reflection. Here, I could absorb the emotions of the men who fought and died at on this field - one of the last bastions for supremacy over the, vital, Mississippi River. Here, the ghosts had time to talk and stories to be shared!

If your time is limited, I recommend heading for the Battlefield. If you are going to spend a few days, in or near St. Francisville, include both The Myrtles and the Battlefield!

The Battlefield is open 9:00AM to 5:00PM daily. The Myrtles is open for tours between 9:00 AM and 4:30 PM daily and offers sumptuous cuisine in their 1796 restaurant as well as a fun, little gift shop.

If you are planning on staying at The Myrtles B&B, you'll want to be sure to book ahead as they regularly fill up. But, if you are going to spend a few days, don't stop with these two!

The Myrtles Plantation, as seen from the rear view, dating from 1796. This house has seen its’ share of history including Yellow Fever epidemics, murders and other hardships which were common in the antebellum South. No wonder it is so haunted!

The Myrtles Plantation, as seen from the rear view, dating from 1796. This house has seen its’ share of history including Yellow Fever epidemics, murders and other hardships which were common in the antebellum South. No wonder it is so haunted!

The gorgeous antebellum Rosedown Plantation is rumored to be haunted and historically significant for the work nature artist, John James Audubon (yes, that one!) turned out while there. Catalpa is another antebellum home and museum which provides a historical and, some say, ghostly recollection of times past. The Butler-Greenwood Mansion is laced with the history of the area and provides another B&B option and receives excellent reviews!

Rosedown Plantation is currently run by the National Parks Service. It is often cited as one of the most intact plantation complexes in the South, dating from 1835 and is widely believed to be haunted.

Rosedown Plantation is currently run by the National Parks Service. It is often cited as one of the most intact plantation complexes in the South, dating from 1835 and is widely believed to be haunted.

Don't forget to stop into St. Francisville and wander around a bit. Retaining its old-time charm, it hosts a variety of cafes offering yummy Southern delights and shopping to please both the discerning and tourists, alike. Many of the buildings in town are historic and offer their own stories, including ghostly tales. St. Francisville and the surrounding area is charming and offers a wonderful respite for the intrepid ghost hunter or historian or foodie or… just go and enjoy the delights yourself! You may find that you develop an appreciation for many new things!

Michelle Tebow is the President of Ultimate Paranormal which specializes in haunted and historic adventures for small groups and independent travelers. Would you like the inside scoop on St. Francisville? We’d be happy to help! www.ultimateparanormal.com





Michelle Tebow